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Use Case:
Dermatologist Consultation in Rooms

Other Use Cases



A Dermatologist is consulting a patient that is worried about a mole. The doctor feels it is suspicious and wants to take a photo of it before removing it.

With PicSafe

  1. The doctor opens the PicSafe® app on his/her personal device and explains to the patient while doing so that he/she would like to take a photo. Upon receiving the patient's agreement, the photo is subsequently taken.
  2. The doctor enters the patient details and records the patient's consent (the patient signs on screen after reading the proposed usage of their photo).
  3. The doctor submits the form and the app uploads a “report” to the medical record system.

Without PicSafe

  1. The doctor opens the camera app on their phone.
  2. The doctor explains, to the patient, they are going to take a photo and takes a photo.
  3. Doctor emails the photo to their receptionist (the email server is in the USA).
  4. The iPhone automatically uploads the photo to iCloud.
  5. The receptionist adds the photo to the patient's record in the clinic software they use (e.g. Medical Director).

The Result (without PicSafe):

  • No consent recorded.
  • Patient data leaves the country.
  • The doctor's phone (and potentially, their commercial application being used) is storing patient data.
  • In breach of multiple Australian Privacy Principles. Potential fine of $340,000 (for individuals) and $1.7 million (for corporations) per privacy breach.

Potential Consequences

If a dermatologists takes photos of 12 patients a day with a scenario similar to described above, to the letter of the law, they would rack up fines of over $500 million per year (12 photos per day x 5 days per week x 48 weeks a year x $174,000 per breach)!

If a corporation is facilitating this and they had a practice of 4 dermatologists, they would rack up files of nearly $20 billion (12 photos per day x 4 dermatologists x 5 days per week x 48 weeks a year x $1,700,000 per breach)!